University of Northern Iowa: Literature in Ireland Capstone

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It may be very significant that the Irish language had no equivalent for the English word “emigrant,” with its voluntary and emotionally neutral connotations.  Rather, the Irish word primarily used to describe one who left Ireland has been deoraí,... read more

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OVERALL RATING 3.4
Based on 6 Reviews
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August 26, 2014 Fun, But Not Worth It.
I didn't really take much away from this program. I learned that travelling in groups is very hard to do. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review
August 19, 2014 Relaxing
I learned that if I'm going to study abroad or even travel, I enjoy being in a place much different than America. Very worthwhile. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review
I learned a lot of History about Ireland. It was cool. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review
August 21, 2014 Very Fun Trip!
I learned a lot about Ireland through literature, and this was interesting. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review
I learned a lot about the history and culture of Ireland. Yes it was worthwhile. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review
August 18, 2014 A New Look
I learned about group dynamics and adaptability. - University of Northern Iowa View Entire Review

About

It may be very significant that the Irish language had no equivalent for the English word “emigrant,” with its voluntary and emotionally neutral connotations.  Rather, the Irish word primarily used to describe one who left Ireland has been deoraí, the literal meaning of which is “exile.”  In Old Irish the form deoraid was a legal term referring to a person without property, and, . . . the word also implied a person without kinfolk or social “place”—an outsider, a stranger, even an outlaw. (Miller 105)
 
This program is centered around the Capstone course,The Myth of Ireland: Literature, Culture, and History, and it involves travel to four locations in Ireland: Dublin, Lisdoonvarna, the western Island Inishbofin, and Galway. Throughout the time abroad, students will visit Irish cultural landmarks while studying key works of Irish literature and often traveling to the places that inspired them. The course examines the development of modern Ireland through literature, focusing on issues including Irish-American immigration, “the Troubles,” and the relationship between urban and rural areas in Ireland.

Program Type(s):
Study Abroad
Program Length(s):
  • Summer
Relevant Study Subject(s):
  • Irish Studies
  • English Language and Literature
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